EVO 08 Workshop Syllabus:

Title: EVO Video 2008: ESL/EFL Video Slideshows and Vlogging

Abstract:
EVO Video 2008: ESL/EFL Video Slide Shows and Vlogging is a free workshop for all teachers interested in learning how to use student-produced video slide shows and vlogs to enhance their classes. Both video slide shows and vlogs can be made available to a wide audience via the web and can therefore become powerful motivational tools. In addition, slide shows can be created in little time with minimal equipment (camera phones and a computer), so they are particularly suited to teachers with limited access to IT resources.

Objectives:
  • Create a video slideshow and upload it to the web.
  • Create a vlog with your favorite Video Blogging service and/or embed your slideshow in a wiki.
  • Share your work with the rest of the group and discuss classroom uses of student video and slide show projects.

Platforms for delivery:


PreSession.gif
Pre-Session (before Jan. 14)
  • *Getting Started* A short list of activities to complete before the session begins.
  • i. Activities


  • Activities
  • 1. Read the article "Video Online" by Elizabeth Hanson-Smith and Mike Marzio.
  • 2. Quickly complete the Needs Assessment Survey.
  • 3. Read the Netiquette document and take the self-quiz.
  • 4. Upload your photo and add your profile to the Participants area of the EVO Video 08 Wiki.
  • 5. Add yourself to our map. Hit your browser's Back button to return to this page.
  • 6. Create your own wiki page and link it to the side bar under "Participant Pages." Here's how:

Week1.gif
Week 1: Jan. 14 – Jan. 20
This week we’ll introduce ourselves. Moreover, participants will learn how to navigate the Yahoo Group and upload files to the wiki (photos) in addition to reading an introductory article and completing the Needs Assessment Survey and Netiquette Quiz (if not already read and completed Pre-Session).
i. Materials
ii. Activities
iii. Benchmarks

Materials
Activities

1. If you have not yet done so, please
  • read the article "Video Online" by Elizabeth Hanson-Smith and Mike Marzio
  • complete the Needs Assessment Survey.
  • read the Netiquette document and take the self-quiz
  • upload your photo and add your profile to the Participants area of the EVO Video 08 Wiki.
  • add yourself to our map. Hit your browser's Back button to return to this page.
  • create your own wiki page and link it to the side bar under "Participant Pages." Here's how:

Tutorial: How to add a page to the wiki and link to it from the side bar. (This tutorial refers to last year's wiki, but the procedure is the same.)

Note: To have an idea of how a wiki can be effectively used to reflect on what happens in the workshop, you can have a look at this wiki from a member of last year's workshop. Of course, you are free to use your wiki in any way you like.

2. Configure your Yahoo Group and Yahoo Email Account settings. Set your options in our Yahoo Group to receive individual messages or to get a daily digest, so you'll know what others have written. To do that, click on Edit My Membership on the top right of our YG front page. Under Message Delivery, check either Individual Emails or Daily Digest. Click Save Changes at the bottom of the screen. (See the Help file, Setting_email_preferences for an illustrated guide.)

3. You may also want to configure your Yahoo Account so that all email from our group goes to one folder – THIS IS EASY TO DO AND HIGHLY RECOMMENDED. Click here for the online tutorial: "How to sort your incoming mail automatically into designated folders,"by Ibrahim Rustamov. Note: This tutorial assumes that you are using Yahoo Mail Classic. If not, please temporarily switch to Classic by clicking on Options in the top right corner and selecting "Switch to Yahoo Mail Classic", follow the instructions in the tutorial, and then switch back to "All-New Mail".

4. Introduce yourself to our EVO group of teachers and trainers by sending an email message to EVOvideo08 at yahoogroups.com. Tell us a little about:
  • Where you teach, and what level and age group you are teaching
  • What your students would like about class-video projects
  • Your past experiences with video and/or class-video projects, if any (include links to examples if possible)
  • Any video production literature you might be using
  • Some of the subjects and topics you would like to learn more about during this session


Benchmarks
I have . . .
  • introduced myself to the YG
  • set my email preferences / configured my yahoo account
  • uploaded a photo to the Photo area of the wiki
  • created my wiki page
  • read the article, "Video Online" by Elizabeth Hanson-Smith and Mike Marzio
  • read Netiquette and taken the self-test
  • completed the Needs Assessment Survey
  • added myself to the map

Week2.gif

Week 2: Jan. 21 – Jan. 27





This week we'll view several example slide shows, and read student evaluations of slide show projects. Participants are welcome to share these slide shows with their own classes and post any feedback. If any of your students want to create a slide show during this session to share with participants and possibly other students around the world, they are encouraged to do so! (We're sure to provide positive feedback.)
We'll also touch on photography (the rule of thirds, composition, and editing).
i. Materials
ii. Activities
iii. Benchmarks

Materials

Activities:
  1. Read the definition of video slide show and then watch several of the Example Slide Shows and read the FAQ about how Sergio's students produced their slide shows. If you have a question that is not answered in the FAQ, feel free to post it to our YG. If the question is for the students who authored the slide shows, please post it no later than January 27. Note that only second-year students are available for questions. Also, note that students may not be able to reply immediately, but will reply by Week 5.
  2. Read the feedback that students who participated in one of Sergio's slide show projects provided to their teacher.
  3. Write to the group -- what are your impressions of the slide shows? Please share the slide shows with your students if possible, and ask them to provide feedback to share with the group.
  4. Check out the Production Overview, Taking Pictures, and Editing Pictures links.
  5. Start thinking about what kind of slide show you want to make. Next week we'll dive into editing software, and start working own our slide shows. Think about what you want to make and TAKE PICTURES / WRITE YOUR SCRIPT THIS WEEK if you can.

Benchmarks
I have . . .
  • read the definition of slide show and viewed several of the example slide shows
  • read the FAQ that explain the context in which some of the sample slide shows were produced
  • read students' feedback about this kind of project
  • surveyed the materials that explain the overall production process and software available
  • surveyed the materials that explain how to take pictures and edit them
  • written to the group
  • started work on my own slide show


Week3.gif
Week 3: Jan. 28 – Feb. 3
(Moderators: Sergio Mazzarelli, Geoff Taylor, and Nicolas Gromik)
This week we'll consider the free software available for editing slide shows, and will start work on our own slide show. The goal of this week and next is to become familiar how to add pictures, text, voice-over, and music -- so that you may be able to help your students with such questions as they come up. (If you finish early and want to jump ahead, you also have the option to view next week's tutorials about vlogging.)

i. Materials
ii. Activities
iii. Benchmarks

Materials

Activities
1. Read Geoff Taylor's account of his experience in creating slide shows.
2. View the tutorial for the editing software you are using.
3. Working alone or with some friends, take pictures for your slide show and, if necessary, edit them using Paint, iphoto, Photoshop, or the like.
4. Write your script and, if you have time, begin editing your slide show. Have fun! We look forward to seeing your work! (The goal is to finish by the end of next week).
5. Write to the group about this week's materials
6. If you finish early and want to jump ahead, preview the Tutorials about Vlogging.
*Please feel free to contact any of the moderators on or off group with questions.

Benchmarks
I have . . .
  • started work on my slide show to share with the group by the end of next week, if not sooner.
  • read Geoff Taylor's account of his experience in creating slide shows
  • written to the group regarding this week's materials

Week4.gif
Week 4: Feb. 4 – Feb. 10
(Moderators: Nicolas Gromik, Sergio Mazzarelli, and Geoff Taylor)
This week we'll continue work on our own slide show. The goal of this week is to add our voice-over recording, music (if applicable), finalize our slide show, export it, and upload it to the web to share with the group.

i. Materials
ii. Activities
iii. Benchmarks

Materials

Activities
1. Record your script and add it to your Project.
2. Add music to your project and adjust the levels. (Remember that music is optional. You can skip this step if you so wish.)
3. Export your slide show and upload it to YouTube or other video hosting website.
4. Watch the tutorials about vlogging
5. Embed your slide shows on the Participant Slide Shows wiki page and, if you like, your favorite video blogging service.
6. Post a message to the YG announcing that your slide show is available.


*Please feel free to contact any of the moderators on or off group with questions.

Benchmarks
I have . . .
  • finished my slide show
  • viewed the video tutorials on vlogging and understood the embedding process
  • shared my slide show with the group

Week5.gif
Week 5: Feb. 11 – Feb. 17

This week we'll view and discuss the slideshows we have created. Moreover, we will reflect on how to evaluate slideshows and how to use them to support international exchanges.

i. Materials
ii. Activities
iii. Benchmarks

Materials

Activities
1. Watch and comment on other participants' video projects and other participants' students' video projects.
2. Now that you've made a slide show, reflect on the process and write to the group -- what was difficult or problematic?
3. Look at the example of a wiki used to support an international exchange. Share any thoughts about it with the group.
4. Are there any other ways in which slide shows could be used to support international exchanges? Share your suggestions with the group.
5. Look at Sergio's sample rubric. How would you evaluate students' slide shows? Share your thoughts with the group.
6. Besides evaluation, are there any other pedagogical issues raised by slide shows that you would like to discuss? Write about them to the group.
7. Take part in our online text chat on slide shows with Kristi Reyes (optional).

Benchmarks
I have . . .
  • watched other participants' slide shows and provided feedback
  • reflected on my own experience in creating a slide show
  • discussed ways in which slide shows can be used to support international exchanges
  • discussed how to evaluate slide shows
  • shared any other pedagogical concerns I may have about slide shows with the group

Note: Next week is the last week of the workshop proper. However, on the following week there is a film festival for slide shows. All workshop participants can submit entries and vote in a poll to choose the best three. You could submit the same videos you have just finished or revised versions of them. Winners will receive beautiful photo books donated by Lonely Planet. The deadline to submit entries for the festival is February 23. To learn more about this exciting opportunity, please click here.

Week6.gif
This week we’ll wrap up with general discussion. Please complete the EVO Evaluation Form.

i. Materials
ii. Activities
iii. Benchmarks

Materials

Activities
1. Read Nicolas’ letter concerning release forms. Please download the release forms from our YG FILES section and save them for future use.
2. Be sure to complete the EVO Evaluation Survey.This is a small price to pay for having had the opportunity to study online!
3. Continue to add to our Links wiki page, and to add to your own wiki page as you complete future projects. We would all love to see what you do with your students in the coming year.

Benchmarks
I have . . .
  • read materials on copyright and privacy issues pertaining to slide shows
  • written to the group about any issues raised by this week's materials or by the course in general
  • completed the EVO SurveyMonkey evaluation

Note: This is the last week of the workshop proper. However, next week there is a film festival for slide shows . All workshop participants can submit entries and vote in a poll to choose the best three. You could submit the same videos you have just finished or revised versions of them. Winners will receive beautiful photo books offered by Lonely Planet. The deadline to submit entries is February 23. To learn more about this exciting opportunity, please click here.

Moderators and Special Advisers

(names and short bios)

Ryan Detwiler earned his BA in English and TESL Certificate at the University of California, Santa Barbara. In 1998 he taught video production to a high intermediate class of ESL students and has been hooked on producing video and web-based content ever since. After living and teaching in France and Japan for a couple of years, Ryan moved to San Francisco, California, to get an MFA in Motion/Pictures and Television at the Academy of Art University. In March of 2005 he founded ESL Video, Inc., an educational software development / production company. He co-moderated the EVO Video 07 workshop.

Nicolas Gromik was born in New Caledonia and educated in Australia, where he first started teaching French. He then moved to Japan where he currently lives and works as an EFL with CALL focus lecturer. In 2005, in Cooperation with Elizabeth and Mike Marzio, he started filmediting4esol EVO TESOL, and since then he hasn't stopped discovering the benefit of integrating video in the classroom as a project-based activity for advanced Japanese learners of English to attempt as a challenge. In 2007, one pair of student produced a 15 minute video on "Orphans in Sendai", and it was submitted in the Sundance Festival; not to win, but go through the whole process of video production from concept to delivery. In his spare time, he makes short documentaries, delivers workshops and presentations on the benefit of video production, and attempts to deliver online resources. He co-moderated the EVO Video 07 workshop.

Born and raised in the USA, Mike Marzio did Masters work at New York University in 1969/1970 in English Education. In 1976, he created a language school in the south of France for the professional needs of corporate customers. In the same year, he began ESL videotaping and editing, resulting in numerous EFL/ESL comedy sketches including We Mean Business, a co-production with Longman. In 1992, he began the Real English project, and more recently his blog. Mike hopes that his practical experience as cameraman, interviewer, and video editor will prove useful to EVO video 2008 participants around the world.

Sergio Mazzarelli was born in Italy. He earned his PhD in English from the University of Birmingham in 1996. Since 1997, he has taught a variety of EFL classes at Kwassui Women's College in Nagasaki, Japan. In 2007, he joined the EVO Video 07 workshop and developed a strong interest in video slideshows, which led him to establish the ESL Slideshow Exchange Site as well as to create the Orandazaka channel on YouTube and to upload his students' video slideshows to it. He hopes to continue producing slideshows and expand class exchanges based on them.

Geoff Taylor trained with International House, has taught adult EFL for over 25 years in Europe, Egypt and the USA, and now teaches full-time at St Clare's, Oxford, England. He got an MEd in Educational Technology and ELT from Manchester University in 2003, and is currently studying web design technologies with eclasses.org. He was a keen participant in EVO Podcasting 06 and EVO Video 07 and has high expectations for EVO Video 08. A long time Mac user and keen advocate of the Apple iLife creative suite, he has run on-site digital video filming, editing and DVD-burning courses for students. Visit his long-running student-generated audio (and occasionally video) podcast at http://bardwellroad.podomatic.com.

Elizabeth Hanson-Smith is co-editor of CALL Environments, 2nd ed. (with Joy Egbert), published by TESOL, Inc., Alexandria, VA: 2007. She has numerous publications in the field of TESOL and has been working with student media projects and teacher training workshops for the last 15 years. Her latest project is a new edition of the Oxford Picture Dictionary Interactive.